Preview Mode Links will not work in preview mode

Equity Outcomes: David Arendale's Narrated Publications


The Equity Outcomes Podcast presents the audio of publications by Dr. David R. Arendale focused on creating an equitable learning environment that supports all students to achieve their educational goals. This will include topics on student-led academic study groups, Universal Design for Learning principles that instructors can use in their classroom, antiracism practices to create inclusive learning environments, and more. You can learn more about this topic by checking out David's website at www.arendale.org  A special web page contains more information about downloadable audiobooks that contain collections of these podcast episodes at www.equityaudiobooks.org 

The following links allow you to subscribe: Apple Podcast, Amazon Music/Audible, Castbox.fm, Deezer, Facebook, Gaana, Google Podcast, iHeartRadio, Player.fm, Radio Public, Samsung Listen, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, Twitter, Vurbal, and YouTube. Automatically available through these podcast apps: AntennaPod, BeyondPod, Blubrry, Castamatic, Castaway 2, Castbox, Castro, iCatcher, Downcast, DoubleTwist, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Podcast Republic, Podcatcher, RSSRadio, and more.

Please post comments to the individual episodes, post to the iTunes podcast review and rating section, and email to me, arendale@umn.edu You can also check out my other four podcasts and additional social media channels at www.davidmedia.org  Thanks for listening.

Nov 24, 2021

(Bonus) Impostor syndrome (also known as impostor phenomenon, impostorism, fraud
syndrome or the impostor experience) is a psychological pattern in which an
individual doubts their skills, talents, or accomplishments and has a persistent internalized fear of being exposed as a "fraud". Despite external evidence of their competence, those experiencing this phenomenon remain convinced that they are frauds and do not deserve all they have achieved. Individuals with impostorism incorrectly attribute their success to luck or the Matthew effect, for example, or they incorrectly interpret it as a result of deceiving others into thinking they are more intelligent than they perceive themselves to be. Impostor syndrome also occurs in normal human-to-human relationships. Based on this syndrome, continuing doubts about people and individual defense mechanisms are considered difficult to achieve healthy relationships. While early research focused on the prevalence among high-achieving women, impostor syndrome has been recognized to affect both men and women equally.