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Equity Outcomes: David Arendale's Narrated Publications


The Equity Outcomes Podcast presents the audio of publications by Dr. David R. Arendale focused on creating an equitable learning environment that supports all students to achieve their educational goals. This will include topics on student-led academic study groups, Universal Design for Learning principles that instructors can use in their classroom, antiracism practices to create inclusive learning environments, and more. You can learn more about this topic by checking out David's website at www.arendale.org  A special web page contains more information about downloadable audiobooks that contain collections of these podcast episodes at www.equityaudiobooks.org 

The following links allow you to subscribe: Apple Podcast, Amazon Music/Audible, Castbox.fm, Deezer, Facebook, Gaana, Google Podcast, iHeartRadio, Player.fm, Radio Public, Samsung Listen, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, Twitter, Vurbal, and YouTube. Automatically available through these podcast apps: AntennaPod, BeyondPod, Blubrry, Castamatic, Castaway 2, Castbox, Castro, iCatcher, Downcast, DoubleTwist, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Podcast Republic, Podcatcher, RSSRadio, and more.

Please post comments to the individual episodes, post to the iTunes podcast review and rating section, and email to me, arendale@umn.edu You can also check out my other four podcasts and additional social media channels at www.davidmedia.org  Thanks for listening.

Nov 21, 2021

(Bonus) Cultural appropriation is the unacknowledged or inappropriate adoption of an element or elements of one culture or
identity by members of another culture or identity. This can be controversial when members of a dominant culture appropriate from minority cultures. According to critics of the practice, cultural appropriation differs from acculturation, assimilation, or equal cultural exchange in that this appropriation is a form of colonialism. When cultural elements are copied from a minority culture by members of a dominant culture, and these elements are used outside of their original cultural context ─ sometimes even against the expressly stated wishes of members of the originating culture – the practice is often received negatively. Cultural appropriation is considered harmful by various groups and individuals, including Indigenous people working for cultural preservation, those who advocate for collective intellectual property rights of the originating, minority cultures, and those who have lived or are living under colonial rule. Cultural appropriation can include the exploitation of another culture's religious and cultural traditions, dance steps, fashion, symbols, language, and music.